Skip to content

BWF Level 1 coaching course smashes Gender Equity targets in Melbourne

Theme:
Leadership
BWF Level 1 coaching course smashes Gender Equity targets in Melbourne

Coaching is the most challenging area when it comes to gender equity in badminton. However, a recent BWF Level 1 Coaching Course in Melbourne smashed the targets for female representation. Badminton Oceania strives for a minimum representation of 40% of the under-represented gender across programme areas by 2024. A BWF Level 1 coach course took in Melbourne smashed the target earlier this year, where 8 (out of 18) participants were female, equating to 44% representation.

Coaching is the most challenging area when it comes to gender equity in badminton. However, a recent BWF Level 1 Coaching Course in Melbourne smashed the targets for female representation.

While the International Olympic Committee and Badminton World Federation strive for 30% female representation across programme areas, Badminton Oceania is also committed to strengthening gender equity across everything that we do. The organisational aim is to achieve a minimum representation of 40% of the under-represented gender by 2024.

Last weekend, the second and final BWF Level 1 coach course took place in Melbourne with a total of 18 participants registered – 8 of which were female, equating to 44% representation.

Two of the participants, Lakshmi and Carol, travelled from Tasmania to undertake the course so they can improve the quality of coaching on offer back home.

“I would love to see the students of mine excel well in badminton. To make students learn both winning and losing as one. To improve their personal, social, emotional, intellectual, and tactical seen as a whole”, says Lakshmi.

Moreover, Carol expressed her interest in continuing her coaching accreditations, with aspirations to complete the BWF Level 2 award along with opportunities in Para badminton. With this, she plans to assist the surge in Para badminton popularity and qualify of coaching in Hobart (Tasmania), where she currently volunteers at a weekly ‘all abilities’ session.

Nonetheless, the lack of female representation continues to be acknowledged by coaches who insist there is a need for greater female role models.

“I think female coaches are underrepresented which causes other women to back off [from coaching]”, says Lakshmi.

It was promising to see an increase in female coaches showing an interest in gaining this qualification as we are keen to encourage more females not only into coaching, but other key areas in badminton too”, says course facilitator, Ian Bridge (Badminton Oceania’s Coaching and Development Officer).

Elsewhere in badminton, Badminton Oceania is proud to have a strong balance between female and male participants across all areas: Executive Board, Staff, Technical Officials, Coaches, Administrators, Shuttle Time Trainers, Tutors and Teachers, Players and Volunteers.

If you are interested in pursuing a coaching qualification, check out the Coach Education page for more information.

Email this Insight

Similar Insights (9)

IAPESGW Five Continents Series of Books
Leadership
Leadership

IAPESGW Five Continents Series of Books

By Dr. Rosa López de D’Amico - International Association of Physical Education for Women & Girls Brighton plus Helsinki 2014 Declaration Signatory
We Play Interactive
Leadership

We Play Interactive

By Sarah Axelson - Women's Sports Foundation Brighton plus Helsinki 2014 Declaration Signatory

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Sign up to receive email updates on new insights, events, partnerships, IWG announcements and more.